Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2020 Mar 20;12(3):828.
doi: 10.3390/nu12030828.

Sustained Cerebrovascular and Cognitive Benefits of Resveratrol in Postmenopausal Women

Affiliations
Free PMC article

Sustained Cerebrovascular and Cognitive Benefits of Resveratrol in Postmenopausal Women

Jay Jay Thaung Zaw et al. Nutrients. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Deficits in the cerebral microcirculation contribute to age-related cognitive decline. In a pilot study of postmenopausal women, we found that supplementation with a low dose of resveratrol, a phytoestrogen, for 14 weeks improved cerebrovascular and cognitive functions. We have since undertaken a larger, longer term study to confirm these benefits. Postmenopausal women aged 45-85 years (n = 129) were randomized to take placebo or 75 mg trans-resveratrol twice daily for 12 months. Effects on cognition, cerebral blood flow, cerebrovascular responsiveness (CVR) and cardiometabolic markers (blood pressure, diabetes markers and fasting lipids) were assessed. Compared to placebo, resveratrol improved overall cognitive performance (P < 0.001) and attenuated the decline in CVR to cognitive stimuli (P = 0.038). The latter effect was associated with reduction of fasting blood glucose (r = -0.339, P = 0.023). This long-term study confirms that regular consumption of resveratrol can enhance cognitive and cerebrovascular functions in postmenopausal women, with the potential to slow cognitive decline due to ageing and menopause.

Keywords: ageing; cerebrovascular function; cognitive decline; menopause; neurovascular coupling; nutraceutical; phytoestrogen; resveratrol.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest. The funders had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, or in the decision to publish the results.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
CONSORT diagram. Flow of participants from initial contact until final assessment.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Performance changes in cognitive domains following placebo and resveratrol treatments.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Changes in basal blood flow velocity (BFV) and pulsatility index (arterial stiffness) following resveratrol and placebo treatments.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Changes in cerebrovascular responsiveness (CVR) to hypercapnia and to cognitive tests following resveratrol and placebo treatments.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Association between treatment change in fasting glucose and treatment change in overall neurovascular coupling following resveratrol supplementation.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

References

    1. GBD 2016 Dementia Collaborators Global, regional, and national burden of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, 1990–2016: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Lancet Neurol. 2019;18:88–106. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(18)30403-4. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Colditz G.A., Willett W.C., Stampfer M.J., Rosner B., Speizer F.E., Hennekens C.H. Menopause and the risk of coronary heart disease in women. N. Engl. J. Med. 1987;316:1105–1110. doi: 10.1056/NEJM198704303161801. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Li R., Singh M. Sex differences in cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. Front. Neuroendocrinol. 2014;35:385–403. doi: 10.1016/j.yfrne.2014.01.002. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Taddei S., Virdis A., Ghiadoni L., Mattei P., Sudano I., Bernini G., Pinto S., Salvetti A. Menopause is associated with endothelial dysfunction in women. Hypertension. 1996;28:576–582. doi: 10.1161/01.HYP.28.4.576. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Matteis M., Troisi E., Monaldo B.C., Caltagirone C., Silvestrini M. Age and sex differences in cerebral hemodynamics: A transcranial Doppler study. Stroke. 1998;29:963–967. doi: 10.1161/01.STR.29.5.963. - DOI - PubMed
Feedback