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. 2020 Apr 3;29(155):200068.
doi: 10.1183/16000617.0068-2020. Print 2020 Mar 31.

Protecting Healthcare Workers From SARS-CoV-2 Infection: Practical Indications

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Free PMC article

Protecting Healthcare Workers From SARS-CoV-2 Infection: Practical Indications

Martina Ferioli et al. Eur Respir Rev. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The World Health Organization has recently defined the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection a pandemic. The infection, that may cause a potentially very severe respiratory disease, now called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has airborne transmission via droplets. The rate of transmission is quite high, higher than common influenza. Healthcare workers are at high risk of contracting the infection particularly when applying respiratory devices such as oxygen cannulas or noninvasive ventilation. The aim of this article is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the correct use of "respiratory devices" in the COVID-19 emergency and protect healthcare workers from contracting the SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of interest: M. Ferioli has nothing to disclose. Conflict of interest: C. Cisternino has nothing to disclose. Conflict of interest: V. Leo has nothing to disclose. Conflict of interest: L. Pisani has nothing to disclose. Conflict of interest: P. Palange has nothing to disclose. Conflict of interest: S. Nava has nothing to disclose.

Figures

FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1
Example of a powered air purifying respirator.
FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2
Correct placement of high-flow nasal cannulas. On the left, correct placement of the cannulas. Nasal cannulas must be completely inserted into the nostrils, the elastic bands must be well secured to the patient's head, it is recommended to avoid folding of the tube near the interface. On the right, placement of a medical mask over the high-flow nasal cannulas. Modified from [19, 20].
FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3
Placement of the filter during bag-mask ventilation. Modified from [19].
FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4
Precautions provided by the Chinese Thoracic Society for bronchoscopy. Ensure the patient wears a cap that also covers the eyes, place a suction catheter in the patient's oral cavity and cover the patient's mouth with a surgical mask. Modified from [19].
FIGURE 5
FIGURE 5
Precautions provided by the Chinese Thoracic Society for bronchoscopy during noninvasive/invasive mechanical ventilation. Use the access port in the patient's mask/the mount. Modified from [19, 20].

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