Does Comorbidity Increase the Risk of Patients With COVID-19: Evidence From Meta-Analysis

Aging (Albany NY). 2020 Apr 8;12(7):6049-6057. doi: 10.18632/aging.103000. Epub 2020 Apr 8.

Abstract

Currently, the number of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has increased rapidly, but relationship between comorbidity and patients with COVID-19 still not clear. The aim was to explore whether the presence of common comorbidities increases COVID-19 patients' risk. A literature search was performed using the electronic platforms (PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, and other databases) to obtain relevant research studies published up to March 1, 2020. Relevant data of research endpoints in each study were extracted and merged. All data analysis was performed using Stata12.0 software. A total of 1558 patients with COVID-19 in 6 studies were enrolled in our meta-analysis eventually. Hypertension (OR: 2.29, P<0.001), diabetes (OR: 2.47, P<0.001), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR: 5.97, P<0.001), cardiovascular disease (OR: 2.93, P<0.001), and cerebrovascular disease (OR:3.89, P=0.002)were independent risk factors associated with COVID-19 patients. The meta-analysis revealed no correlation between increased risk of COVID-19 and liver disease, malignancy, or renal disease. Hypertension, diabetes, COPD, cardiovascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease are major risk factors for patients with COVID-19. Knowledge of these risk factors can be a resource for clinicians in the early appropriate medical management of patients with COVID-19.

Keywords: COVID-19; comorbidity; meta-analysis; risk.

Publication types

  • Meta-Analysis

MeSH terms

  • Comorbidity*
  • Coronavirus Infections / epidemiology*
  • Humans
  • Pandemics
  • Pneumonia, Viral / epidemiology*
  • Risk Assessment

Supplementary concepts

  • COVID-19