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. 2020 Apr 11;S0149-2918(20)30189-2.
doi: 10.1016/j.clinthera.2020.04.003. Online ahead of print.

Echoes of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic in the COVID Pandemic

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Free PMC article

Echoes of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic in the COVID Pandemic

Ravi Jhaveri. Clin Ther. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV2) pandemic that has engulfed the globe has had incredible effects on health care systems and economic activity. Social distancing and school closures have played a central role in public health efforts to counter the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID)-19 pandemic. The most recent global pandemic prior to COVID-19 was the 2009 pandemic, hemagglutinin type 1 and neuraminidase type 1 (H1N1) influenza. The course of events in 2009 offer some rich lessons that could be applied to the current COVID-19 pandemic. This commentary highlights some of the most relevant points and a discussion of possible outcomes of the COVID-19 pandemic. © 2020 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords: 2009 pandemic H1N1; COVID; SARS-CoV2; influenza; school closures; social distancing.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Influenza circulation in a typical season and in 2009–2010. A, In a typical season (this example is 2015–2016), influenza starts to circulate in late November and December, reaches peak activity in January and February, and then tapers off by late April. B, The onset of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic came in March, with an early peak coming in May. Activity declined over the summer with school adjournment, but never fully disappeared. In late August with schools reopening, virus activity reached an even higher fall peak. After widespread infections, influenza activity dropped by negligible activity after December, with few infections during the usual peak months of January and February. One will also notice that the case counts and percentages of positive tests in 2009–2010 were ~5-fold those seen in a normal season. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Reproduced from CDC graphs.

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