Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Review
. 2020 Apr 26;8(8):1385-1390.
doi: 10.12998/wjcc.v8.i8.1385.

Hypertransaminasemia in the Course of Infection With SARS-CoV-2: Incidence and Pathogenetic Hypothesis

Affiliations
Free PMC article
Review

Hypertransaminasemia in the Course of Infection With SARS-CoV-2: Incidence and Pathogenetic Hypothesis

Maddalena Zippi et al. World J Clin Cases. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

In patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, the respiratory symptoms, such as fever, cough and dyspnea, are the most frequent clinical manifestations. These patients may also present with less well-defined symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and/or abdominal discomfort both at the time of diagnosis and during the clinical course. In a few cases, these symptoms may also present before the appearance of respiratory symptoms. To penetrate the body, Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 uses ACE2 receptors, which are present not only in respiratory epithelium but also in gastrointestinal mucosa and liver cholangiocytes. In several cases, viral RNA is detectable in the stool of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The liver damage seems to show a multifactorial origin. About 2%-11% of patients with COVID-19 have known underlying hepatic pathologies. In 14%-53% of COVID-19 cases, there is an alteration of the indices of liver cytolysis and is more frequently observed in severe forms of COVID-19, especially during hospitalization.

Keywords: COVID-19; Coronavirus; Hypertransaminasemia; Liver; Meta-analysis; SARS-CoV-2.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict-of-interest statement: The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Possible mechanisms underlying the liver damage. COVID-19: Coronavirus disease 2019.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Meta-analysis of the studies focusing on hypertransaminasemia in coronavirus disease 2019 patients.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

References

    1. Andrea G, Daniele D, Barbara A, Davide M, Laura A, Paolo R, Alessandra B, Giorgio R. Coronavirus Disease 2019 and Transplantation: a view from the inside. Am J Transplant. 2020
    1. Jiang F, Deng L, Zhang L, Cai Y, Cheung CW, Xia Z. Review of the Clinical Characteristics of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) J Gen Intern Med. 2020 - PMC - PubMed
    1. Zhang C, Shi L, Wang FS. Liver injury in COVID-19: management and challenges. Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2020 - PMC - PubMed
    1. Ksiazek TG, Erdman D, Goldsmith CS, Zaki SR, Peret T, Emery S, Tong S, Urbani C, Comer JA, Lim W, Rollin PE, Dowell SF, Ling AE, Humphrey CD, Shieh WJ, Guarner J, Paddock CD, Rota P, Fields B, DeRisi J, Yang JY, Cox N, Hughes JM, LeDuc JW, Bellini WJ, Anderson LJ SARS Working Group. A novel coronavirus associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome. N Engl J Med. 2003;348:1953–1966. - PubMed
    1. Leung WK, To KF, Chan PK, Chan HL, Wu AK, Lee N, Yuen KY, Sung JJ. Enteric involvement of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus infection. Gastroenterology. 2003;125:1011–1017. - PMC - PubMed
Feedback