Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2020 May 17;e1056.
doi: 10.1002/mbo3.1056. Online ahead of print.

An Oral Health Optimized Diet Reduces the Load of Potential Cariogenic and Periodontal Bacterial Species in the Supragingival Oral Plaque: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

Affiliations
Free article

An Oral Health Optimized Diet Reduces the Load of Potential Cariogenic and Periodontal Bacterial Species in the Supragingival Oral Plaque: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

Christian Tennert et al. Microbiologyopen. .
Free article

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the effects of an oral health optimized diet on the composition of the supragingival oral plaque in a randomized controlled trial. Participants of the standard diet group (n = 5) had a diet high in processed carbohydrates and did not change their dietary behavior during the observation. The healthy diet group (n = 9) had to change the diet after 2 weeks from a diet high in processed carbohydrates to a diet low in carbohydrates, rich in omega-3 fatty acids, rich in vitamins C and D, antioxidants and fiber for 4 weeks. Saliva and supragingival plaque samples were taken at the end of week two and eight of the observation period to investigate the composition of microbiota in saliva and supragingival plaque. Data were subjected to an exploratory analysis to identify significant differences. Statistically significant differences were only found in the healthy diet group between the baseline (week 2) and the final sample (week 8) for specific species in plaque and saliva samples. A reduction of the total counts of Streptococcus mitis group, Granulicatella adiacens, Actinomyces spp., and Fusobacterium spp. was found in plaque samples of the healthy diet group. In saliva samples of the healthy diet group, the total counts of Actinomyces spp. and Capnocytophaga spp. decreased. A diet low in carbohydrates, rich in omega-3 fatty acids, rich in vitamins C and D, and rich in fiber reduced Streptococcus mitis group, Granulicatella adiacens, Actinomyces spp., and Fusobacterium spp. in the supragingival plaque.

Keywords: fatty acids; low-carb diet; nutrition; omega 3; oral microbiota; vitamins.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

References

REFERENCES

    1. Adler, C. J., Dobney, K., Weyrich, L. S., Kaidonis, J., Walker, A. W., Haak, W., … Cooper, A. (2013). Sequencing ancient calcified dental plaque shows changes in oral microbiota with dietary shifts of the Neolithic and Industrial revolutions. Nature Genetics, 45(4), 450-455, 455e1.
    1. Aizawa, S., Miyasawa-Hori, H., Nakajo, K., Washio, J., Mayanagi, H., Fukumoto, S., & Takahashi, N. (2009). Effects of alpha-amylase and its inhibitors on acid production from cooked starch by oral streptococci. Caries Research, 43(1), 17-24.
    1. Al-Ahmad, A., Maier, J., Follo, M., Spitzmuller, B., Wittmer, A., Hellwig, E., … Jonas, D. (2010). Food-borne enterococci integrate into oral biofilm: An in vivo study. Journal of Endodontics, 36(11), 1812-1819. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2010.08.011
    1. Anderson, A. C., Sanunu, M., Schneider, C., Clad, A., Karygianni, L., Hellwig, E., & Al-Ahmad, A. (2014). Rapid species-level identification of vaginal and oral lactobacilli using MALDI-TOF MS analysis and 16S rDNA sequencing. BMC Microbiology, 14, 312. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12866-014-0312-5
    1. Baumgartner, S., Imfeld, T., Schicht, O., Rath, C., Persson, R. E., & Persson, G. R. (2009). The impact of the stone age diet on gingival conditions in the absence of oral hygiene. Journal of Periodontology, 80(5), 759-768. https://doi.org/10.1902/jop.2009.080376

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback