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. 2020 May 11;141:111418.
doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2020.111418. Online ahead of print.

COVID-19, an Opportunity to Reevaluate the Correlation Between Long-Term Effects of Anthropogenic Pollutants on Viral Epidemic/Pandemic Events and Prevalence

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Free PMC article

COVID-19, an Opportunity to Reevaluate the Correlation Between Long-Term Effects of Anthropogenic Pollutants on Viral Epidemic/Pandemic Events and Prevalence

Aristidis Tsatsakis et al. Food Chem Toxicol. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Occupational, residential, dietary and environmental exposures to mixtures of synthetic anthropogenic chemicals after World War II have a strong relationship with the increase of chronic diseases, health cost and environmental pollution. The link between environment and immunity is particularly intriguing as it is known that chemicals and drugs can cause immunotoxicity (e.g., allergies and autoimmune diseases). In this review, we emphasize the relationship between long-term exposure to xenobiotic mixtures and immune deficiency inherent to chronic diseases and epidemics/pandemics. We also address the immunotoxicologic risk of vulnerable groups, taking into account biochemical and biophysical properties of SARS-CoV-2 and its immunopathological implications. We particularly underline the common mechanisms by which xenobiotics and SARS-CoV-2 act at the cellular and molecular level. We discuss how long-term exposure to thousand chemicals in mixtures, mostly fossil fuel derivatives, exposure toparticle matters, metals, ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation, ionizing radiation and lifestyle contribute to immunodeficiency observed in the contemporary pandemic, such as COVID-19, and thus threaten global public health, human prosperity and achievements, and global economy. Finally, we propose metrics which are needed to address the diverse health effects of anthropogenic COVID-19 crisis at present and those required to prevent similar future pandemics.

Keywords: COVID-19; Chronic diseases; Coronavirus; Epidemic; Immune deficiency; Pandemic; Pollutants; SARS-CoV-2; Xenobiotics.

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of competing interest The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper.

Figures

Image 1
Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Association of global crude oil, atmospheric pollutants and pesticide production with population growth and chronic disease trends.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Xenobiotics, viruses, bacteria, obesity and aging acting through AhR.
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Molecular and cellular mechanisms triggered by long term pesticide exposure. Pesticides induced pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) of macrophages, aromatase expression, growth factors and oxidative stress, oestrogenicity, carcinogenesis, DNA damage, genomic, epigenetic changes, obesity and abnormal embryo development.
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Transcriptional alterations induced by selective pesticides.
Fig. 5
Fig. 5
The common mechanisms through which exposure to different stressors and viruses leads to inhibition of immune system.

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