ChicagO Multiethnic Prevention and Surveillance Study (COMPASS): Increased Response Rates Among African American Residents in Low Socioeconomic Status Neighborhoods

J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2021 Feb;8(1):186-198. doi: 10.1007/s40615-020-00770-2. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Abstract

African American (AA) populations experience persistent health disparities in the USA. Low representation in bio-specimen research precludes stratified analyses and creates challenges in studying health outcomes among AA populations. Previous studies examining determinants of bio-specimen research participation among minority participants have focused on individual-level barriers and facilitators. Neighborhood-level contextual factors may also inform bio-specimen research participation, possibly through social norms and the influence of social views and behaviors on neighbor's perspectives. We conducted an epidemiological study of residents in 5108 Chicago addresses to examine determinants of bio-specimen research participation among predominantly AA participants solicited for participation in the first 6 years of ChicagO Multiethnic Prevention and Surveillance Study (COMPASS). We used a door-to-door recruitment strategy by interviewers of predominantly minority race and ethnicity. Participants were compensated with a $50 gift card. We achieved response rates of 30.4% for non-AA addresses and 58.0% for AA addresses, with as high as 80.3% response among AA addresses in low socioeconomic status (SES) neighborhoods. After multivariable adjustment, we found approximately 3 times the odds of study participation among predominantly AA addresses in low vs. average SES neighborhoods (odds ratio (OR) = 3.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.20-4.24). Conversely, for non-AA addresses, we observed no difference in the odds of study participation in low vs. average SES neighborhoods (OR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.69-1.14) after multivariable adjustment. Our findings suggest that AA participants in low SES neighborhoods may be recruited for bio-specimen research through door-to-door approaches with compensation. Future studies may elucidate best practices to improve bio-specimen research participation among minority populations.

Keywords: Bio-specimen; Epidemiology; Health disparities; Research participation; Study design.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • African Americans / statistics & numerical data*
  • Chicago / epidemiology
  • Cohort Studies
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Patient Selection*
  • Poverty Areas*
  • Residence Characteristics / statistics & numerical data*