Stopping the SARS-CoV-2 surge in the USA-CDC recommendations and ground realities

Adv Respir Med. 2020;88(3):173-175. doi: 10.5603/ARM.a2020.0099.

Abstract

As of May 10, 2020, the United States of America (USA) has 1,367,079 cases of SARS CoV-2 and 80,773 deaths associated with the disease. New York alone has more than 333,000 cases and nearly 21,271 deaths. As we are trying to reopen our economies, the biggest risk we face is a surge in the immediate cases of new infections. The second wave of infection in the fall has also been predicted. As per the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) latest data set, among the dead from SARS COV-2 in the USA, 80% were 65 years or older. Despite lower percentages of people living in nursing homes and the fact that they represented only 11% of total cases of SARS CoV-2 cases, the maximum death rate has been seen there. A staggering 27,700 people died in long-term facilities in the USA as per the database by the New York Times. These deaths accounted for one-third of the deaths related to SARS CoV-2, making it the most intensively hurt group of al. lThe ground reality is that unfortunately, even now, most of these facilities do not have enough tests that can stop the outbreak. We suggest special targeting of residents of long-term care facilities, and the HCPs involved in these facilities to stop the spread of SARS CoV-2. Extreme measures including the highest testing numbers should be allocated to these facilities and rigorous Infection control measures should be undertaken so that the SARS-CoV-2 virus does not enter and infect the patients in these facilities and if it does, it is limited to the facility.

Keywords: COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; coronavirus; nursing homes; pandemic.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Betacoronavirus*
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S.
  • Coronavirus Infections / epidemiology*
  • Coronavirus Infections / mortality
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Mass Screening / trends*
  • Middle Aged
  • Pandemics
  • Pneumonia, Viral / epidemiology*
  • Pneumonia, Viral / mortality
  • Practice Guidelines as Topic
  • Primary Prevention / trends*
  • United States

Supplementary concepts

  • COVID-19
  • severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2