Understanding the trajectory of research efforts in atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors: a bibliometric analysis of the 50 most impactful studies to date

Childs Nerv Syst. 2021 Feb;37(2):419-425. doi: 10.1007/s00381-020-04863-5. Epub 2020 Aug 17.

Abstract

Purpose: Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) is a highly malignant embryonal tumor of the central nervous system (CNS) that occurs predominantly in children. More is being discovered about this disease to improve understanding and outcomes. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate citation and other bibliometric characteristics of the 50 most cited articles in the contemporary literature in order to better model the trajectory of our current efforts.

Methods: Elsevier's Scopus database was searched for the 50 most cited articles about ATRT. To look for trends, earliest 25 articles were separated from the latest 25 articles and then were compared. Various bibliometric parameters were summarized and compared using Pearson's chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests.

Results: The 50 most cited articles were published between 1990 and 2016, from 5 unique countries in 29 unique journals, with genetic and retrospective observational cohort studies the most common design (n = 11 each). Overall median values were as follows: citation count, 145.4 citations (range, 67-626); citation rate per year, 11.7 (range, 3.5-51.4); number of authors 12 (range, 1-95); with 32 (64%) originating from the USA. Compared with older articles, newer articles had statistically lower citation counts (101.8 vs 189.0; P < 0.01), higher number of authors (17.3 vs 6.6; P < 0.01), and were less likely published from the USA (40% vs 88%; P < 0.01) CONCLUSIONS: The 50 most cited articles about ATRT were characterized in this analysis. There was a distinct focus in these studies on the genetic composition and consequences of these tumors. Trends over time suggest greater impact will be had in highly collaborative efforts worldwide. Moving forward, it will be of great interest to see how the findings of these basic science finding will translate into future clinical studies.

Keywords: ATRT; Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors; Bibliometric; Brain cancer; Most cited; Pediatric.