Chronic Treatment with Cannabidiolic Acid (CBDA) Reduces Thermal Pain Sensitivity in Male Mice and Rescues the Hyperalgesia in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome

Neuroscience. 2021 Jan 15;453:113-123. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2020.09.041. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Abstract

Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurologic disorder, characterized by severe behavioural and physiological symptoms. RTT is caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene in about 95% of cases and to date no cure is available. Recent evidence suggests that non-euphoric phytocannabinoids (pCBs) extracted from Cannabis sativa may represent innovative therapeutic molecules for RTT, with the cannabinoid cannabidivarin having beneficial effects on behavioural and brain molecular alterations in RTT mouse models. The present study evaluated the potential therapeutic efficacy for RTT of cannabidiolic acid (CBDA; 0.2, 2, 20 mg/kg through intraperitoneal injections for 14 days), a pCB that has proved to be effective for the treatment of nausea and anxiety in rodents. This study demonstrates that systemic treatment with the low dose of CBDA has anti-nociceptive effects and reduces the thermal hyperalgesia in 8 month-old MeCP2-308 male mice, a validated RTT mouse model. CBDA did not affect other behavioural or molecular parameters. These results provide support to the antinociceptive effects of CBDA and stress the need for further studies aimed at clarifying the mechanisms underlying the abnormal pain perception in RTT.

Keywords: Rett syndrome; cannabidiolic acid; pain; phytocannabinoids; transgenic mice.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Cannabinoids* / pharmacology
  • Disease Models, Animal
  • Hyperalgesia / drug therapy
  • Male
  • Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2
  • Mice
  • Pain
  • Rett Syndrome* / complications
  • Rett Syndrome* / drug therapy

Substances

  • Cannabinoids
  • Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2
  • cannabidiolic acid