Endoscopic pilonidal sinus treatment: A minimally invasive surgical technique

Asian J Endosc Surg. 2021 Jul;14(3):458-463. doi: 10.1111/ases.12893. Epub 2020 Nov 12.

Abstract

Introduction: Pilonidal sinus disease (PSD) is a common skin and subcutaneous disease that is mainly seen in men (mean age, 30 years); its incidence rate is 26 cases per 100 000. PSD greatly affects quality of life. Ideally, a surgical procedure to treat PSD should involve a minimal hospital stay and require minimal time off work, discomfort, operative time, and cost; it should also limit recurrence. In this study, we present a new minimally invasive technique for pilonidal sinus surgery known as endoscopic pilonidal sinus treatment (EPSiT).

Methods: From February 2017 to April 2019, 100 patients diagnosed with PSD were treated with the EPSiT method at the Department of General Surgery, Imam Reza Hospital. Patient information was recorded prospectively. During the operation, the fistula cavity and tracts were ablated by an electrode that was introduced through the operative channel. All the epithelial and granulation tissues were removed by a brush inserted into the operative channel or by a Volkmann spoon.

Results: None of the patients had postoperative complications, such as hematoma, seroma, or wound infection, during the follow-up period. Recurrence was seen four patients (4%). At 1 week postoperatively, the visual analog scale score was 3 for 37 patients (37%) and 2 for 28 patients (28%). The maximal cosmetic satisfaction rate was reported in 85 patients (85%).

Conclusion: As a minimally invasive procedure, EPSiT is effective for treating PSD. Compared with excision and primary closure techniques, EPSiT has a very low recurrence rate after the procedure and a short hospital stay.

Keywords: EPSiT; endoscopic pilonidal sinus treatment; minimally invasive surgery; pilonidal sinus disease.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures*
  • Pilonidal Sinus* / surgery
  • Recurrence
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Young Adult