Association between meat intake and mortality due to all-cause and major causes of death in a Japanese population

PLoS One. 2020 Dec 15;15(12):e0244007. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0244007. eCollection 2020.

Abstract

Purpose: We examined the association between meat intake and mortality due to all-cause and major causes of death using a population-based cohort study in Japan.

Methods: 87,507 Japanese aged between 45 and 74 years old at 5-year follow-up study were followed for 14.0 years on average. Associations between meat intake and mortality risk were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model.

Results: A heavy intake of total meat was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality relative to the lowest quartile intake in men (Q4: HR,1.18; 95%CIs, 1.06-1.31). A higher intake of total meat was associated with a lower risk of stroke mortality in women (Q2: HR, 0.70; 95%CIs, 0.51-0.94, Q3: HR, 0.68; 95%CIs, 0.50-0.95, Q4: HR, 0.66; 95%CIs, 0.44-0.99). A heavy intake of red meat was also associated with all-cause mortality (Q4: HR, 1.13; 95%CIs, 1.02-1.26) and heart disease mortality (Q4: HR, 1.51; 95%CIs, 1.11-2.06) in men but not in women. Heavy intake of chicken was inversely associated with cancer mortality in men.

Conclusions: Heavy intakes of total and red meat were associated with an increase in all-cause and heart disease mortality in men, while total meat intake was associated with a lower risk of stroke mortality in women.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Aged
  • Diet, Western / adverse effects
  • Diet, Western / statistics & numerical data*
  • Female
  • Heart Diseases / mortality*
  • Humans
  • Japan
  • Male
  • Meat Products / adverse effects
  • Meat Products / statistics & numerical data*
  • Middle Aged
  • Mortality / trends
  • Neoplasms / mortality*
  • Sex Factors
  • Stroke / mortality*

Grants and funding

This study was supported by National Cancer Center Research and Development Fund (23-A-31[toku], 26-A-2 and 29-A-4) (since 2011) and a Grant-in-Aid for Cancer Research from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan (from 1989 to 2010). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.