Double dissociation in radial and rotational motion sensitivity

PLoS One. 2021 Jan 28;16(1):e0246094. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0246094. eCollection 2021.

Abstract

Neurophysiological experiments have shown that a shared region of the primate visual system registers both radial and rotational motion. Radial and rotational motion also share computational features. Despite these neural and computational similarities, prior experiments have disrupted radial, but not rotational, motion sensitivity -a single dissociation. Here we report stimulus manipulations that extend the single dissociation to a double dissociation, thereby showing further separability between radial and rotational motion sensitivity. In Exp 1 bilateral plaid stimuli with or without phase-noise either radiated or rotated before changing direction. College students reported whether the direction changed first on the left or right-a temporal order judgment (TOJ). Phase noise generated significantly larger disruptions to rotational TOJs than to radial TOJs, thereby completing the double dissociation. In Exp 2 we conceptually replicated this double dissociation by switching the task from TOJs to simultaneity judgments (SJs). Phase noise generated significantly larger disruptions to rotational SJs than to radial SJs. This disruption pattern reversed after changing the plaids' motion from same- to opposite-initial directions. The double dissociations reported here revealed distinct dependencies for radial and rotational motion sensitivity. Radial motion sensitivity depended strongly on information about global depth. Rotational motion sensitivity depended strongly on positional information about local luminance gradients. These distinct dependencies arose downstream from the neural mechanisms that detect local linear components within radial and rotational motion. Overall, the differential impairments generated by our psychophysical experiments demonstrate independence between radial and rotational motion sensitivity, despite their neural and computational similarities.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Motion Perception / physiology*
  • Rotation
  • Time Perception / physiology*
  • Visual Perception / physiology*

Grant support

The authors received no specific funding for this work.