Prevalence of high-risk human papilloma virus infection and abnormal cytology of the anal transformation zone in women with cervical dysplasia. Bogotá, Colombia, 2017-2019

Rev Colomb Obstet Ginecol. 2020 Dec;71(4):345-355. doi: 10.18597/rcog.3558.

Abstract

Objective: To determine the prevalence of anal infection caused by high risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) and of abnormal anal cytology in women with confirmed cervical dysplasia.

Methods: Cross sectional study that included patients between 30 and 65 years of age with a new diagnosis of cervical dysplasia by histopathology attended in two lower genital tract colposcopy and pathology units (one public and one private institution), conducted between December 2017 and April 2019. Women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, immune compromise (use of steroids, transplant, chemo therapy), pregnancy or anorectal malformations were excluded. Consecutive sampling. Socio demographic variables, intercourse type, degree of cervical dysplasia, positive results of HR HPV Polymerase Chain Reaction test in anal canal and HR - HPV type indentified (16-18 or others) were evaluated. Descriptive statistics were used.

Results: Of 188 candidates, 100 were included in the analysis. A 32 % prevalence of high-risk HPV infection and a 2.8 % prevalence of abnormal cytology in the anal canal (ASCUS) were found. Of the HR-HPV infections in the anal canal, 68.8 % corresponded to HR-HPV genotypes different from 16 or 18.

Conclusions: Prevalence of HR HPV infection in women with lower genital tract dysplasia was 32%. It is important to determine the usefulness of screening for anal mucosa compromise by HPV virus associated with a high risk of cancer in women with cervical dysplasia. Studies are needed on the prognosis of anal HR-HPV infection in women with cervical dysplasia.

Titulo: PREVALENCIA DE INFECCIÓN POR VIRUS DEL PAPILOMA HUMANO DE ALTO RIESGO Y CITOLOGÍA ANORMAL EN LA ZONA DE TRANSFORMACIÓN ANAL EN MUJERES CON DISPLASIA CERVICAL. BOGOTÁ, COLOMBIA, 2017-2019.

Objetivo: Establecer la prevalencia de infección anal por virus de papiloma humano de alto riesgo (VPH- AR) y citología anal anormal en mujeres con displasia cervical confirmada.

Metodos: Estudio de corte transversal que incluyó pacientes entre 30 y 65 años con diagnóstico nuevo de displasia cervical por histopatología, en dos unidades de colposcopia y patología del tracto genital inferior (una de carácter público y otra privada) entre diciembre de 2017 y abril de 2019. Se excluyeron mujeres con infección por virus de inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH), inmuno compromiso (uso de esteroides, trasplante, quimioterapia), en embarazo o con malformaciones anorrectales. Muestreo consecutivo. Se evaluaron variables sociodemográficas, tipo de relaciones sexuales, el grado de displasia cervical, resultado positivo de prueba de reacción en cadena de la polimerasa para VPH de alto riesgo en canal anal y tipo de VPH-AR identificado (16-18 u otro). Se utilizó estadística descriptiva.

Resultados: De 188 candidatas a ingresar se incluyeron 100 pacientes en el análisis, se encontró unaprevalencia de 32 % de infección por VPH de alto riesgo y de 2,8 % de citología anal anormal (ASCUS) en el canal anal. El 68,8 % de las infecciones por VPH-AR en el canal anal correspondió a genotipos de VPH-AR diferentes a 16 o 18.

Conclusiones: La prevalencia de infección anal por VPH-AR en mujeres con displasia cervical fue del 32 %. Es importante determinar la utilidad del tamizaje del compromiso de la mucosa anal por virus VPH de alto riesgo de cáncer en mujeres con displasia cervical. Se requieren estudios sobre el pronóstico de la infección anal por VPH-AR en las mujeres con displasia cervical.

Keywords: citología; Human papilloma virus; anal canal; canal anal; cervical dysplasia; cytology; diagnosis; diagnóstico; displasia cervical; prevalence; prevalencia; virus de papiloma humano.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Anal Canal*
  • Colombia / epidemiology
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Papillomaviridae / genetics
  • Prevalence
  • Uterine Cervical Neoplasms*