Polymerase-chain reaction testing to prevent hospital-acquired severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection in Shinjuku, an epicenter in Tokyo: The Tokyo Women's Medical University model

Respir Investig. 2021 May;59(3):356-359. doi: 10.1016/j.resinv.2020.12.009. Epub 2021 Jan 26.

Abstract

Hospital-acquired severe acute respiratory virus coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is a healthcare challenge. We hypothesized that polymerase chain reaction testing of symptomatic triaged outpatients and all inpatients before hospitalization in Shinjuku, a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epicenter in Tokyo, using the Tokyo Women's Medical University (TMWU) model would be feasible and efficient at preventing COVID-19. This retrospective study enrolled 2981 patients from March to May 2020. The prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection was 1.81% (95% credible interval [CI]: 0.95-3.47%) in triaged symptomatic outpatients, 0.04% (95% CI: 0.0002-0.2%) in scheduled asymptomatic inpatients, 3.78% (95% CI: 1.82-7.26%) in emergency inpatients, and 2.4% (95% CI: 1.49-3.82%) in symptomatic patients. There were no cases of hospital-acquired SARS-CoV-2 infection. This shows that the TWMU model could prevent hospital-acquired SARS-CoV-2 infection and is feasible and effective in reducing the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the hospitals.

Keywords: COVID-19; Hospital-acquired infections; PCR testing; SARS-CoV-2; Tokyo Woman's medical university model.

MeSH terms

  • Acute Disease
  • COVID-19 / diagnosis*
  • COVID-19 / prevention & control*
  • COVID-19 / virology
  • COVID-19 Testing / methods*
  • Cross Infection / diagnosis*
  • Cross Infection / prevention & control*
  • Female
  • Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia / diagnosis*
  • Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia / prevention & control*
  • Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia / virology
  • Hospitals, University
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Polymerase Chain Reaction / methods*
  • SARS-CoV-2 / genetics
  • SARS-CoV-2 / isolation & purification
  • SARS-CoV-2 / pathogenicity
  • Schools, Medical
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Tokyo