Patient Preferences of Low-Dose Aspirin for Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer Prevention in Italy: A Latent Class Analysis

Patient. 2021 Apr 8. doi: 10.1007/s40271-021-00506-2. Online ahead of print.

Abstract

Background: Patients taking low-dose aspirin to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) may also benefit from a reduced risk of colorectal cancer (CRC).

Objective: The aim was to examine the preferences of people eligible for preventive treatment with low-dose aspirin and the trade-offs they are willing to make between CVD prevention, CRC prevention, and treatment risks.

Methods: A cross-sectional study using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) survey was conducted in Italy in 2019 to elicit preferences for three benefit attributes (prevention of ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, and CRC) and four risk attributes (intracranial and gastrointestinal bleeding, peptic ulcer, and severe allergic reaction) associated with use of low-dose aspirin. Latent class logit models were used to evaluate variation in treatment preferences.

Results: The DCE survey was completed by 1005 participants eligible for use of low-dose aspirin. A four-class model had the best fit for the primary CVD prevention group (n = 491), and a three-class model had the best fit for the secondary CVD prevention group (n = 514). For the primary CVD prevention group, where classes differed on age, education level, type 2 diabetes, exercise, and low-dose aspirin use, the most important attributes were intracranial bleeding (two classes), myocardial infarction (one class), and CRC (one class). For the secondary CVD prevention group, where classes differed on various comorbidities, self-reported health, exercise, and CVD medication use, the most important attributes were intracranial bleeding (two classes), myocardial infarction (one class), and gastrointestinal bleeding (one class).

Conclusion: Patient preferences for the benefits and risks of low-dose aspirin differ significantly among people eligible for treatment as primary or secondary CVD prevention.