Patient-provider discussions of bariatric surgery and subsequent weight changes and receipt of bariatric surgery

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2021 Aug;29(8):1338-1346. doi: 10.1002/oby.23183. Epub 2021 Jun 10.

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients who discuss bariatric surgery with their providers are more likely to undergo the procedure and to lose weight.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study of adults with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 treated between 2000 and 2015 was conducted to analyze the relationship between a discussion of bariatric surgery in the first year after study entry and weight changes (primary outcome) and receipt of bariatric surgery (secondary outcome) over 2 years after study entry. Natural language processing was used to identify the documentation of bariatric surgery discussion in electronic provider notes.

Results: Out of 30,560 study patients, a total of 2,659 (8.7%) discussed bariatric surgery with their providers. The BMI of patients who discussed bariatric surgery decreased by 2.18 versus 0.21 for patients who did not (p < 0.001). In a multivariable analysis, patients who discussed bariatric surgery with their providers lost more weight (by 1.43 [change in BMI]; 95% CI: 1.29-1.57) and had greater odds (10.2; 95% CI: 9.0-11.6; p < 0.001) of undergoing bariatric surgery.

Conclusions: Clinicians rarely discussed bariatric surgery with their patients. Patients who did have this discussion were more likely to lose weight and to undergo bariatric surgery.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Bariatric Surgery*
  • Humans
  • Obesity, Morbid*
  • Retrospective Studies