Predominant sexually transmitted diseases among different age and ethnic groups of indigent sexually active adolescents attending a family planning clinic

J Adolesc Health Care. 1988 Jul;9(4):291-5. doi: 10.1016/0197-0070(88)90252-5.

Abstract

The present study analyzed a group of 113 sexually active, indigent female adolescents attending a family planning clinic, for age, ethnic, or racial trends in the recovery of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma species, and Ureaplasma urealyticum. The overall recovery rate for N. gonorrhoeae was 8/112 (7.1%), with the highest rate occurring in black patients (7/82, 8.5%). The overall recovery rate for C. trachomatis was 31/113 (27.4%), with the highest rate occurring in Hispanics (7/21, 33.3%). The isolation of C. trachomatis was evenly divided among patients grouped by reason for visit. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, on the other hand, was isolated more frequently from patients coming for a sexually transmitted disease screen than from those attending for other reasons. There was a significant (p less than 0.05) increase in isolation of Mycoplasma species from 18-19-year-old patients, but no such difference was observed for U. urealyticum when compared to younger age groups. Factors associated with venereal disease prevalence in our teenage indigent population as well as implications for the future reproductive health of such patients are discussed.

PIP: The present study analyzed a group of 113 sexually active US indigent female adolescents attending a family planning clinic in a large urban area for age, ethnic, or racial trands in the recovery of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma species, and Ureaplasma urealyticum. The overall recovery rate for N. gonorrhoeae was 8/112 (7.1%), with the highest rate occurring in black patients (7/82, 8.5%). The overall recovery rate for C. trachomatis was 31/113 (27.4%), with the highest rate occurring in Hispanics (7/21, 33.3%). The isolation of C. trachomatis was evenly divided among patients grouped by reason for visit. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, on the other hand, was isolated more frequently from patients coming for a sexually transmitted disease screen than from those attending for other reasons. There was a significant (p 0.05 increase in isolation of Mycoplasma species from 18-19-year-old patients, but no such difference was observed for U. urealyticum when compared to younger age groups. C. Trachomatis may be a relatively common cause of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and PID attributed to Chlaymdia may have mild intial manifestations. Hence, many sexually active young females may unknowingly be infected and at risk for developing PID and its potential sequelae. Thus the high incicence of C. trachomatis when compared to gonorrhea suggests that rountine screening for C. trachomatis is as important as gonorrhoeae screening in adolescents. Culture for specimens of Mycoplasma species in patients with PID is a prudent measure if a laparoscopy specimen is available but it is impractical to screen all patients routinely for these organisms. Further research should focus on variables associated with racial/ethnic differences in relation to different aspects of sexual behavior and attitudes.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • African Americans
  • Age Factors
  • Ambulatory Care Facilities
  • Chlamydia Infections / epidemiology
  • Chlamydia Infections / ethnology
  • Chlamydia trachomatis
  • European Continental Ancestry Group
  • Family Planning Services
  • Female
  • Gonorrhea / epidemiology
  • Gonorrhea / ethnology
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Humans
  • Mycoplasma Infections / epidemiology
  • Mycoplasma Infections / ethnology
  • Poverty
  • Sexual Behavior
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases / epidemiology
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases / ethnology*
  • Texas