Effect of Regular Taekwondo Self-Defense Training on Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Markers in Postmenopausal Women

Healthcare (Basel). 2021 Aug 3;9(8):985. doi: 10.3390/healthcare9080985.

Abstract

We aimed to investigate the effect of a 12-week Taekwondo self-defense training course on oxidative stress and inflammation in postmenopausal women. Sixteen middle-aged women participated and were randomized into two groups: a control group (CG, n = 8) and a Taekwondo self-defense training group (TSDG, n = 8). The TSDG was trained for 60 min, four times per week, for 12 weeks. Following the Taekwondo training intervention, side-step was significantly higher in the TSDG than in the CG (p < 0.001). Malondialdehyde levels were significantly lower after the intervention than before in the TSDG (p < 0.01). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were also significantly higher after the intervention than before in the TSDG (p < 0.001). After the Taekwondo training intervention, SOD levels were significantly higher in the TSDG than in the CG (p < 0.01). Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) levels were significantly lower after the intervention than before in the TSDG (p < 0.05). After the Taekwondo training intervention, TNF-α levels were significantly lower in the TSDG than in the CG (p < 0.05). The results of this study suggest that Taekwondo self-defense training is an effective exercise that improves agility, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses in postmenopausal women.

Keywords: antioxidant enzymes; exercise; lipid profile; martial arts; physical fitness; reactive oxygen species.