Effect of changes in perfusion defect size during serial stress myocardial perfusion imaging on cardiovascular outcomes in patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention after myocardial infarction

J Nucl Cardiol. 2021 Sep 13. doi: 10.1007/s12350-021-02770-z. Online ahead of print.

Abstract

Background: We evaluated the prognostic value of changes in perfusion defect size (PDS) on serial MPS in patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

Methods: We enrolled 112 patients treated with primary PCI after AMI who underwent two stress MPS within 1 month and after 6 months. Improvement in PDS was defined as a reduction ≥5%. Remodeling was defined as an increase in left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volume index ≥20%. Cardiac events included cardiac death, nonfatal MI, unstable angina, repeated revascularization, and heart failure.

Results: During a median follow-up of 86 months, 22 events occurred. Event rate was higher (P < .01) in patients with worsening of PDS compared to those with unchanged or improved PDS. Moreover, patients with remodeling had a higher (P < .001) event rate compared to those without. At Cox analysis, worsening of PDS and remodeling resulted independent predictors of events (both P < .01). Patients with both worsening of PDS and remodeling had the worst event-free survival (P <.001).

Conclusion: In patients treated with primary PCI after AMI, worsening of PDS and remodeling are associated to higher risk of events at long-term follow-up. Gated stress MPS improves risk stratification in these patients.

Keywords: Diagnostic and prognostic application; MPI; SPECT.