Radiographic parameters associated with excellent versus poor range of motion outcomes following reverse shoulder arthroplasty

Shoulder Elbow. 2022 Feb;14(1):39-47. doi: 10.1177/1758573220936234. Epub 2020 Jul 9.

Abstract

Background: The purpose was to evaluate the relationship of component size and position to postoperative range of motion following reverse shoulder arthroplasty. The hypothesis was that increased lateralization, larger glenospheres, and a decreased acromiohumeral distance would be associated with excellent postoperative range of motion.

Methods: A retrospective multicenter study was performed at a minimum of one year postoperatively on 160 patients who underwent primary reverse shoulder arthroplasty with a 135° humeral component. Outcomes were stratified based on postoperative forward flexion and external rotation into excellent (n = 42), defined as forward flexion >140° and external rotation > 30°, or poor (n = 36), defined as forward flexion <100° and external rotation < 15°. Radiographic measurements and component features were compared between the two groups.

Results: A larger glenosphere size was associated with an excellent outcome (p = 0.009). A 2-mm posterior offset humeral cup (p = 0.012) and an increased inferior glenosphere overhang (3.1 mm vs 1.4 mm; p = 0.002) were also associated with excellent outcomes. Humeral lateralization and distalization were not associated with an excellent outcome.Conclusion: Larger glenosphere size and inferior positioning as well as posterior humeral offset are associated with improved postoperative range of motion following reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

Level of evidence: Level 3, retrospective comparative study.

Keywords: Reverse shoulder arthroplasty; distalization; external rotation; forward flexion; implant position; lateralization; range of motion.