Association between genetic risk of high SBP and hypertension control: the CoLaus|PsyColaus study

J Hypertens. 2022 Jul 1;40(7):1388-1393. doi: 10.1097/HJH.0000000000003158. Epub 2022 Jun 10.

Abstract

Objective: To assess whether a genetic risk score (GRS) for high SBP is associated with poor control of hypertension.

Methods: Data from the four waves of a population-based, prospective study conducted in Lausanne, Switzerland. Control of hypertension was defined based on SBP less than 140 mmHg and DBP less than 90 mmHg. A weighted GRS was computed from 362 SNPs.

Results: Overall, 1097 (51% men, mean age 61 years), 1126 (53% men, age 65 years), 1020 (52% men, age 69 years) and 809 (50% men, age 71 years) participants treated for hypertension were selected from the baseline (2003-2006), first (2009-2012), second (2014-2017) and third (2018-2021) surveys. Hypertension control rates were 50, 58, 52 and 59% for the baseline, first, second and third surveys, respectively. No association was found between GRS and hypertension control: multivariate-adjusted mean ± standard error for controlled vs. uncontrolled participants: 9.30 ± 0.09 vs. 9.50 ± 0.09 ( P = 0.12); 9.32 ± 0.08 vs. 9.53 ± 0.10 ( P = 0.10); 9.17 ± 0.08 vs. 9.34 ± 0.11 ( P = 0.22), and 9.18 ± 0.09 vs. 9.46 ± 0.11 ( P = 0.07) for the baseline, first, second and third surveys, respectively. Power analysis showed that a minimum of 3410 people treated for hypertension would be necessary to detect an association between the GRS and hypertension control rates. Notably, positive associations between the GRS and SBP levels were found among participants not treated for hypertension, with Spearman correlations ranging between 0.05 and 0.09 (all P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Using a GRS associated with SBP levels is not predictive of hypertension control. The use of GRS for hypertension management is not warranted in clinical practice.

http://links.lww.com/HJH/C26.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Aged
  • Blood Pressure / genetics
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Hypertension* / diagnosis
  • Hypertension* / epidemiology
  • Hypertension* / genetics
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
  • Prospective Studies
  • Risk Factors