The publication impact of the first 100 THOR Network publications by bibliometric and social network analyses

Transfusion. 2022 Aug;62 Suppl 1:S1-S11. doi: 10.1111/trf.16956. Epub 2022 Jun 29.

Abstract

Background: A specialized international multidisciplinary group of investigators wanted to determine the performance and impact of publications presented at an annual conference over a 6 year period. Specifically, the group wanted to know if the influence of the conference publications extended beyond conference publication authors and attendees. Bibliometric methods and network analyses were used to evaluate the performance and impact of 100 peer-reviewed publications presented at the Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research (THOR) Network Remote Damage Control Resuscitation (RCDR) Symposia from 2012 to 2017 (published 2013-2018). Further analysis was performed on the affiliations of conference attendees who attended from the years of 2012 to 2017.

Study design and methods: This project used normative and relative bibliometric measures and social network analysis to evaluate the performance and impact of 100 peer-reviewed publications presented at the Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research (THOR) Network RDCR Symposia from 2012 to 2017. Publication and citation data were from Elsevier Scopus, a bibliographic citation database. Metrics from Elsevier SciVal were selected for the project to normalize for group size, year of publication, and document type. A six-year period of publications presented at the Symposia, published from 2013 to 2018, was selected for analysis. The publication and citation data were further analyzed using Elsevier SciVal and the iCite database from the National Institutes of Health Office of Portfolio Analysis. Sci2, VOSviewer, and Gephi were used for social network analyses and visualization.

Results: The 100 publications presented at the Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research (THOR) Network Remote Damage Control Resuscitation (RCDR) Symposia from 2012 to 2017 demonstrate reach and influence beyond the authors of the THOR publications or the THOR attendees. Citations to the THOR publications were published in 10 languages and 313 unique journals, with author affiliations from 62 countries. Citation metrics for the THOR publications exceed global averages with 65% of the THOR publications being in the 25% citation percentiles. When benchmarking the THOR publications using six homogenous comparator groups, the THOR publications demonstrate higher citation metrics than any of the comparator groups with more citations per publication, a higher average of cited publications, higher FWCI and outputs in the top citation percentiles among the six groups. The Office of Portfolio Analysis (OPA) iCite database was used to calculate potential to translate for the THOR publications with 57 of the THOR publications cited by clinical articles with an average approximate potential to translate score of 65.3%.

Conclusions: The value of international groups with sharing of research and knowledge are instrumental in enhancing the uptake for best practices for in medicine and treatment of hemorrhagic shock resuscitation. The use of bibliometric methods and network analyses, along with benchmarking, demonstrated reach and impact beyond the THOR Network. Limitations include use of a single source for analysis of publication and citation; and that publication data alone does not provide a full overview of research performance. Despite these limitations, bibliometric methods, social network analyses, and benchmarking can help centers better understand their impact.

Keywords: administration; blood center operations; health research methodology.

MeSH terms

  • Bibliometrics*
  • Databases, Factual
  • Hemostasis
  • Humans
  • Social Network Analysis*