GuitarPD: A Randomized Pilot Study on the Impact of Nontraditional Guitar Instruction on Functional Movement and Well-Being in Parkinson's Disease

Parkinsons Dis. 2022 Jun 25;2022:1061045. doi: 10.1155/2022/1061045. eCollection 2022.

Abstract

Playing musical instruments may have positive effects on motor, emotional, and cognitive deficits in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This pilot study examined the feasibility of a six-week nontraditional guitar instruction program for individuals with PD. Twenty-six participants with idiopathic PD (Age: 67.22 ± 8.07; 17 males) were randomly assigned to two groups (intervention first or 6 weeks of usual care control exposure) with stepwise exposure to the guitar intervention condition with cross-over at six weeks. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 weeks. Twenty-four participants completed the study. Combined analysis of the groups showed significant BDI-II improvement immediately after intervention completion (3.04 points, 95% CI [-5.2, -0.9], p = 0.04). PDQ-39 total quality of life scores improved from baseline to immediately postintervention 5.19 points (95% CI [-9.4, -1.0]) at trend significance (corrected p = 0.07). For Group 1 (exposed to the intervention first), MDS-UPDRS total scores improved by a mean of 8.04 points (95% CI [-12.4, -3.7], p = 0.004) and remained improved at 12 weeks by 10.37 points (95% CI [-14.7, -6.0], p < 0.001). This group also had significant improvements in mood and depression at weeks 6 and 12, remaining significant at week 18 (BDI-II: 3.75, 95% CI [-5.8, -1.7], p = 0.004; NeuroQoL-depression: 10.6, 95% CI [-4.9. -1.4], p = 0.004), and in anxiety at week 6 and week 18 (NeuroQoL; 4.42, 95% CI [-6.8, -2.1], p = 0.004; 3.58, 95% CI [-5.9, -1.2], p = 0.02, respectively). We found clinically and statistically significant improvements in mood/anxiety after 6 weeks of group guitar classes in individuals with PD. Group guitar classes can be a feasible intervention in PD and may improve mood, anxiety, and quality of life.