Housing environments and asthma outcomes within population-based samples of adults and children in NYC

Prev Med. 2022 Aug;161:107147. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2022.107147. Epub 2022 Jul 6.

Abstract

Exposure to indoor environmental risk factors is associated with patterns of asthma morbidity. In this study, we assessed the relationship between housing type (i.e., home ownership, public housing, rental assistance, rent-controlled housing and other rental housing) and asthma outcomes among New York City (NYC) adults and children (ages 1-13). We used the 2019 NYC Community Health Survey (CHS) and 2019 NYC KIDS survey to analyze associations between housing type and ever having been diagnosed with asthma ("ever asthma") and experiencing a past-year asthma attack. We further examined whether associations were modified by smoking status (among adults), smoking within the home (among children), and overweight/obesity. Among adults, living in public housing, compared to home ownership, was associated with higher odds of ever asthma (odds ratio [OR] = 1.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.35, 2.84), and past-year asthma attack (OR = 2.24; 95% CI 1.21,4.18). Living in rental assistance housing was also significantly associated with ever asthma (OR = 1.75; 95% CI 1.16, 2.66). Associations between public or rental assistance housing and ever asthma were marginally non-significant among children. Associations between living in public or rental assistance housing and ever asthma were more pronounced among ever smokers than among never smokers. Housing environments remain important predictors of both pediatric and adult asthma morbidity. Associations between living in subsidized housing and asthma outcomes among adults are most apparent among ever smokers.

Keywords: Asthma; Disparities; Housing.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Asthma* / epidemiology
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Housing*
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • New York City / epidemiology
  • Odds Ratio
  • Public Housing
  • Smoking