Clinicopathological features of appendiceal goblet cell adenocarcinoma in Japan: a multicenter retrospective study

Surg Today. 2023 Feb;53(2):174-181. doi: 10.1007/s00595-022-02562-z. Epub 2022 Aug 1.

Abstract

Purpose: In the 5th edition of the World Health Organization classification, appendiceal goblet cell adenocarcinoma (GCA) is categorized separately from neuroendocrine tumors and other appendiceal adenocarcinomas. We clarified the clinicopathological characteristics of Japanese appendiceal GCA.

Methods: We designed a retrospective multicenter cohort study and retrieved the data of patients with appendiceal neoplasms and histologically diagnosed appendiceal goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) treated from January 2000 to December 2017 in Japan. The available GCC slides were reviewed and diagnosed with a new grading system of GCA.

Results: A total of 922 patients from 43 institutions were enrolled; of these, 32 cases were patients with GCC (3.5%), and 20 cases were ultimately analyzed. The 5-year survival rate was 61.4% (95% confidence interval: 27.4-83.2), and the median survival time was 93.1 months. For peritoneal metastasis, regional lymph node metastasis was a significant factor (p = 0.04), and Grade 3 was a potential factor (p = 0.07). No peritoneal metastasis was observed in either T1/2 patients (n = 2) or Grade 1 patients (n = 4). We were unable to detect any significant factors associated with regional lymph node metastasis.

Conclusion: For peritoneal metastasis, regional lymph node metastasis was a significant factor, and Grade 3 was a potential factor.

Keywords: Additional operation; Appendix; Goblet cell adenocarcinoma.

Publication types

  • Multicenter Study

MeSH terms

  • Adenocarcinoma* / pathology
  • Appendiceal Neoplasms* / pathology
  • Appendiceal Neoplasms* / therapy
  • Carcinoid Tumor* / pathology
  • Carcinoid Tumor* / secondary
  • Carcinoid Tumor* / therapy
  • Cohort Studies
  • Goblet Cells / pathology
  • Humans
  • Japan / epidemiology
  • Lymphatic Metastasis / pathology
  • Retrospective Studies