Specific subsystems of the inferior parietal lobule are associated with hand dysfunction following stroke: A cross-sectional resting-state fMRI study

CNS Neurosci Ther. 2022 Dec;28(12):2116-2128. doi: 10.1111/cns.13946. Epub 2022 Aug 23.

Abstract

Aim: The inferior parietal lobule (IPL) plays important roles in reaching and grasping during hand movements, but how reorganizations of IPL subsystems underlie the paretic hand remains unclear. We aimed to explore whether specific IPL subsystems were disrupted and associated with hand performance after chronic stroke.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we recruited 65 patients who had chronic subcortical strokes and 40 healthy controls from China. Each participant underwent the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Hand and Wrist and resting-state fMRI at baseline. We mainly explored the group differences in resting-state effective connectivity (EC) patterns for six IPL subregions in each hemisphere, and we correlated these EC patterns with paretic hand performance across the whole stroke group and stroke subgroups. Moreover, we used receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to distinguish the stroke subgroups with partially (PPH) and completely (CPH) paretic hands.

Results: Stroke patients exhibited abnormal EC patterns with ipsilesional PFt and bilateral PGa, and five sensorimotor-parietal/two parietal-temporal subsystems were positively or negatively correlated with hand performance. Compared with CPH patients, PPH patients exhibited abnormal EC patterns with the contralesional PFop. The PPH patients had one motor-parietal subsystem, while the CPH patients had one sensorimotor-parietal and three parietal-occipital subsystems that were associated with hand performance. Notably, the EC strength from the contralesional PFop to the ipsilesional superior frontal gyrus could distinguish patients with PPH from patients with CPH.

Conclusions: The IPL subsystems manifest specific functional reorganization and are associated with hand dysfunction following chronic stroke.

Keywords: Granger causality analysis; effective connectivity; hand dysfunction; inferior parietal lobule; resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging; stroke.

MeSH terms

  • Brain Mapping
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Hand
  • Humans
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging*
  • Parietal Lobe
  • Stroke* / complications