The effect of delayed umbilical cord clamping on Newborn's oxygen saturation and sucking success in primiparous pregnant

J Obstet Gynaecol Res. 2022 Sep 5. doi: 10.1111/jog.15417. Online ahead of print.

Abstract

Aim: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of delayed umbilical cord clamping on the newborn's oxygen saturation and sucking success in primiparas.

Methods: The study was conducted based on the experimental model with a control group, between March 15-November 10, 2020. The sample of the study consisted of 101 primiparous pregnant (48 primiparous with delayed cord clamping within 1-3 min and 53 primiparous with early cord clamping within 1 min) (having no high-risk pregnancy, 38-42 weeks, vaginal birth) in Turkey. The data were collected using a personal information form, the LATCH breastfeeding tool and the pulse oximetry. Statistical analyses were conducted using percentage distribution, arithmetic means, chi-square testing, and independent samples t-testing.

Results: Oxygen saturation values of newborns with delayed umbilical cord clamping were higher than those of newborns with early cord clamping. The saturation was first minute 66.43 versus 74.37, fifth minute 81.90 versus 88.60, tenth minute 91.77 versus 94.50 (p < 0.05). When compared to the group with early cord clamping, oxygen saturation is higher in the first by 11.95%, in the fifth by 8.18%, and in the tenth minute by 2.97% in the group with delayed cord clamping. The LATCH breastfeeding scores were found to be higher in the group with delayed cord clamping compared to the group with early cord clamping.

Conclusion: It was determined that delayed cord clamping positively affected oxygen saturation values and sucking success in neonatal babies. Delayed umbilical cord clamping is an important issue that needs to be addressed in its different dimensions.

Keywords: SO2; delayed cord clamping; evidence-based practice; neonatal oxygen saturation; primiparous; sucking success.