Mycobiota and mycotoxin-producing fungi in southern California: their colonisation and in vitro interactions

Mycology. 2022 Jul 27;13(4):293-304. doi: 10.1080/21501203.2022.2104950. eCollection 2022.

Abstract

Fungal contamination in water-damaged houses has become a major concern because of their potential health effects. During our survey in 100 water-damaged houses in southern California, we have reported 42 outdoor and 14 indoor fungal species throughout the year. Six commonly occurring indoor fungal species are Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus niger, Chaetomium globosum, Cladosporium herbarum, Penicillium chrysogenum and Stachybotrys chartarum. In the damp building materials, S. chartarum was found to be associated with A. niger, C. globosum and P. chrysogenum but not with A. alternata and C. herbarum. Stachybotrys chartarum showed strong antagonistic effect against A. alternata and C. herbarum and significantly inhibited in vitro growth of A. alternata and C. herbarum but had no effect on A. niger, C. globosum and P. chrysogenum. Two trichothecenes, produced by Stachybotrys sp., trichodermin and trichodermol, significantly inhibited spore germination and in vitro growth of A. alternata and C. herbarum but had no effect on A. niger, C. globosum, P. chrysogenum and S. chartarum. In the damp building materials (drywall, ceiling tile, and oak wood), S. chartarum significantly inhibited the growth of A. alternata and C. herbarum and had no effect on A. niger, C. globosum and P. chrysogenum in these substrata.

Keywords: Indoor and outdoor air-borne fungi; fungal colonisation; in vitro interactions; mycotoxins.

Grants and funding

The project was financially supported by Pasteur Laboratory’s R & D Department.