Current Trends in the Use of Postless Hip Arthroscopy: A Survey of the International Society for Hip Arthroscopy Membership

Orthop J Sports Med. 2022 Dec 23;10(12):23259671221143353. doi: 10.1177/23259671221143353. eCollection 2022 Dec.

Abstract

Background: Previous studies have demonstrated the risks of pudendal nerve and/or soft tissue complications due to the use of a perineal post during hip arthroscopy. Recently, various postless hip arthroscopy techniques have been described in the literature.

Purpose: To assess the current international trends in the use of postless hip arthroscopy among hip preservation specialists.

Study design: Cross-sectional study.

Methods: An anonymous 11-item survey was sent by email to all members of the International Society for Hip Arthroscopy (ISHA) in January 2022. Surgeons were asked various questions regarding their current use of post-assisted or postless hip arthroscopy, if they had changed their setup technique during their career and the reason for that change, and their perceived rate of pudendal nerve and/or perineal soft tissue injuries using their current technique. Descriptive statistics were used to report the results of each question. The Student t test was used to compare the number of years in practice between post-assisted and postless users. Fisher exact tests were performed to compare categorical rates of pudendal nerve and soft tissue complications between post-assisted and postless users.

Results: A total of 126 surveys were completed from 431 ISHA members (29.2%). Sixty-one percent of the surgeons currently use a perineal post, while 33% use a postless technique. Seventy-five percent of the perineal post users and 98% of the postless users self-reported a rate of pudendal nerve and/or soft tissue injury of <1% (P = .015). Among 41 respondents who indicated changing their technique at some point, 59% reported doing so because of pudendal nerve and/or soft tissue complications. Among surgeons who switched from a perineal post to a postless setup, 71% indicated they have noticed a decrease in the rate of pudendal nerve and/or soft tissue complications.

Conclusion: Although use of a perineal post is still a more common setup technique among hip arthroscopists, approximately one-third of surgeons use a postless technique. Surgeons who have switched to a postless technique often did so because of perineal complications, with the majority noticing a subjective decrease in these complications with the use of postless hip arthroscopy.

Keywords: complications; hip arthroscopy; perineal post; postless hip arthroscopy; pudendal nerve.