The Association Between Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection and Central Line Access

Crit Care Med. 2023 Jun 1;51(6):787-796. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000005838. Epub 2023 Mar 15.

Abstract

Objectives: Identifying modifiable risk factors associated with central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) may lead to modifications to central line (CL) management. We hypothesize that the number of CL accesses per day is associated with an increased risk for CLABSI and that a significant fraction of CL access may be substituted with non-CL routes.

Design: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with at least one CL device day from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2019. A multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression model was used to estimate the association between the number of CL accesses in a given CL device day and prevalence of CLABSI within the following 3 days.

Setting: A 395-bed pediatric academic medical center.

Patients: Patients with at least one CL device day from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2019.

Interventions: None.

Measurements and main results: There were 138,411 eligible CL device days across 6,543 patients, with 639 device days within 3 days of a CLABSI (a total of 217 CLABSIs). The number of per-day CL accesses was independently associated with risk of CLABSI in the next 3 days (adjusted odds ratio, 1.007; 95% CI, 1.003-1.012; p = 0.002). Of medications administered through CLs, 88% were candidates for delivery through a peripheral line. On average, these accesses contributed a 6.3% increase in daily risk for CLABSI.

Conclusions: The number of daily CL accesses is independently associated with risk of CLABSI in the next 3 days. In the pediatric population examined, most medications delivered through CLs could be safely administered peripherally. Efforts to reduce CL access may be an important strategy to include in contemporary CLABSI-prevention bundles.

MeSH terms

  • Bacteremia* / epidemiology
  • Bacteremia* / etiology
  • Catheter-Related Infections* / etiology
  • Catheterization, Central Venous* / adverse effects
  • Central Venous Catheters* / adverse effects
  • Child
  • Humans
  • Retrospective Studies