The frequency of dominant cataract and recessive specific-locus mutations in mice derived from 80 or 160 mg ethylnitrosourea per kg body weight treated spermatogonia

Mutat Res. 1986 Aug;162(1):69-80. doi: 10.1016/0027-5107(86)90072-2.

Abstract

A systematic comparison of the frequency of dominant cataract and recessive specific-locus mutations in mice has been extended to include results for 80 and 160 mg ethylnitrosourea per kg body weight spermatogonial treatment. The frequency of confirmed dominant cataract mutations in the historical control, 80 and 160 mg/kg ethylnitrosourea treatment groups was 1/22594, 8/5090 and 14/6435, respectively. The frequency of recessive specific-locus mutations in the same dose groups was, respectively, 19/227805, 20/13274 and 35/8658. These present results confirm previous results, which indicate that ethylnitrosourea is effective in inducing both recessive specific-locus and dominant cataract mutations although the per locus mutation rate to recessive alleles was observed to be approximately 6 times greater than the per locus mutation rate to dominant alleles. The exclusion of certain classes of lens opacity variant phenotypes, previously demonstrated not to be due to a dominant mutation, from the group of suspected dominant cataract mutations subjected to a genetic confirmation test has greatly improved the efficiency of the test. A total of 23 dominant cataract mutations were confirmed from a group of 67 phenotypic variants. Of the 23 confirmed dominant cataract mutations, 8 were shown to have reduced transmission to the following generation of offspring expressing the mutant phenotype. These results are also consistent with previous results for ethylnitrosourea or radiation treatment in which it was shown that approximately one-third of the recovered mutations have reduced penetrance. One group of dominant cataract mutations, with phenotypic effects on the polar, sub-capsular or corneal regions, is overly represented in the group of recovered mutations with a reduced transmission of offspring expressing the mutant phenotype. Two hypotheses are suggested for this observation, both dependent on the fact that the regions affected indicate that the mutations are expressed later in the development of the eye. Either all carrier individuals have not expressed the phenotype at the time of examination and classification, or later acting mutations are more subject to environmental interactions resulting in more variable expression. Finally, it is argued that a dominant cataract mutation test represents a most practicable protocol to screen for induced dominant mutations in germ cells of the mouse. The imposition of the criterion that suspected variants be subjected to a genetic confirmation test has at least two advantages beside the fact that results represent unambiguous mutational events.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Cataract / chemically induced
  • Cataract / genetics*
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Ethylnitrosourea / toxicity*
  • Female
  • Genes, Dominant* / drug effects
  • Genes, Recessive* / drug effects
  • Male
  • Mice
  • Mutation*
  • Phenotype
  • Spermatogonia / drug effects*
  • Spermatozoa / drug effects*

Substances

  • Ethylnitrosourea