A comprehensive review on mango allergy: Clinical relevance, causative allergens, cross-reactivity, influence of processing techniques, and management strategies

Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf. 2024 Mar;23(2):e13304. doi: 10.1111/1541-4337.13304.

Abstract

Mangoes (Mangifera indica) are widely prized for their abundant nutritional content and variety of beneficial bioactive compounds and are popularly utilized in various foods, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics industries. However, it is important to note that certain proteins present in mango can trigger various allergic reactions, ranging from mild oral allergy syndrome to severe life-threatening anaphylaxis. The immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity of mango is mainly associated with three major allergenic proteins: Man i 1 (class IV chitinase), Man i 2 (pathogenesis-related-10 protein; Bet v 1-related protein), and Man i 4 (profilin). Food processing techniques can significantly affect the structure of mango allergens, reducing their potential to cause allergies. However, it is worth mentioning that complete elimination of mango allergen immunoreactivity has not been achieved. The protection of individuals sensitized to mango should be carefully managed through an avoidance diet, immediate medical care, and long-term oral immunotherapy. This review covers various aspects related to mango allergy, including prevalence, pathogenesis, symptoms, and diagnosis. Furthermore, the characterization of mango allergens and their potential cross-reactivity with other fruits, vegetables, plant pollen, and seeds were discussed. The review also highlights the effects of food processing on mango and emphasizes the available strategies for managing mango allergy.

Keywords: allergy management strategy; clinical relevance; cross-reactivity; food processing technique; mango allergy.

Publication types

  • Review
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Allergens / adverse effects
  • Clinical Relevance
  • Food Hypersensitivity* / diagnosis
  • Food Hypersensitivity* / epidemiology
  • Food Hypersensitivity* / etiology
  • Humans
  • Mangifera*
  • Pollen

Substances

  • Allergens