Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Use of Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Adults With Chronic Medical Conditions: BRFSS 2012-2020

Prev Chronic Dis. 2024 Feb 22:21:E12. doi: 10.5888/pcd21.230257.

Abstract

Introduction: People with chronic conditions and people with colorectal cancer (CRC) may share common risk factors; thus, CRC screening is important for people with chronic conditions. We examined racial and ethnic differences in the use of CRC screening among people with various numbers of chronic conditions.

Methods: We included data on adult respondents aged 50 to 75 years from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System in 2012 through 2020. We categorized counts of 9 conditions as 0, 1, 2, 3, and ≥4. We classified self-reported CRC screening status as up to date or not. We used Poisson models to estimate adjusted prevalence ratios (APRs) among the different counts of chronic conditions in 4 racial and ethnic groups: Hispanic adults with limited English proficiency (LEP), Hispanic adults without LEP, non-Hispanic Black adults, and non-Hispanic White adults.

Results: Overall, 66.5% of respondents were up to date with CRC screening. The prevalence of being up to date increased with the number of chronic conditions. We found disparities among racial and ethnic groups. Hispanic respondents with LEP had lower rates than non-Hispanic White adults of being up to date with CRC screening across all counts of chronic conditions (APR for 0 conditions = 0.67; 95% CI, 0.64-0.71; APR for ≥4 conditions = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.79-0.91). Hispanic respondents without LEP with 0, 1, or 2 conditions were less likely than non-Hispanic White respondents to be up to date with CRC screening. We found no significant differences between non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White respondents.

Conclusion: We found disparities among Hispanic BRFSS respondents with LEP, who had lower rates than non-Hispanic White respondents of being up to date with CRC screening, regardless of the number of chronic conditions. Tailored interventions are needed to address these disparities and improve screening rates, particularly among Hispanic people.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
  • Chronic Disease
  • Colorectal Neoplasms* / diagnosis
  • Early Detection of Cancer*
  • Humans
  • Racial Groups