The frequency of colorectal lesions in the first-degree relatives of patients with colorectal lesions among PERSIAN Guilan Cohort Study population (PGCS)

BMC Gastroenterol. 2024 Feb 26;24(1):88. doi: 10.1186/s12876-024-03177-z.

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to investigate the frequency of colorectal lesions in the first-degree relatives of patients with colorectal lesions among the Prospective Epidemiological Research Studies in Iran (PERSIAN )Guilan Cohort Study (PGCS) population.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 162 first-degree relatives with a history of colorectal lesions were randomly selected from 52 participants in PGCS. All subjects underwent total colonoscopy by a gastroenterologist, and a pathologist evaluated colorectal biopsies. Also, individuals' demographic information, clinical data, and dietary habits were recorded.

Results: The mean age of the participants was 56.55 ± 7.04. Of 86 colon polyps, 52 neoplastic and 34 non-neoplastic polyps were observed in 56 patients (34.6%). Individuals with age > 60 years had 3.29-fold increased odds of developing colorectal polyps (OR = 3.29, 95% CI: 1.13-9.56, P = 0.029). The smokers were 2.73 times more susceptible to developing colorectal polyps than non-smokers (OR = 2.73, 95% CI: 1.24-6.02, P = 0.013). Moreover, consumption of vegetables more than three times per day was associated with decreased OR of colorectal polyp development (OR = 0.43, CI: 0.19-0.98, P = 0.045).

Conclusions: Considering the high prevalence of neoplastic colorectal polyps among the first-degree relatives of patients with colorectal lesions, early screening is recommended for individuals with a family history of colorectal lesions.

Keywords: Adenomatous polyps; Colorectal lesions; First-degree relatives; Malignancy; Screening.

MeSH terms

  • Cohort Studies
  • Colonic Polyps* / diagnosis
  • Colonic Polyps* / epidemiology
  • Colonic Polyps* / genetics
  • Colonoscopy
  • Colorectal Neoplasms* / diagnosis
  • Colorectal Neoplasms* / epidemiology
  • Colorectal Neoplasms* / genetics
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Humans
  • Iran / epidemiology
  • Middle Aged
  • Prospective Studies