Mycobacterial, fungal, actinomycotic, and nocardial infections of the pleura

Clin Chest Med. 1985 Mar;6(1):63-75.

Abstract

Granulomatous pleuritis is relatively common, comprising about 10 per cent of all pleural effusions. A search for the etiologic agent is important since mycobacteria, fungi, and the higher bacteria Actinomyces and Nocardia produce similar clinical, radiographic, and pleural fluid findings. The appropriate use of diagnostic tests including pleural biopsy and serologic techniques is discussed, as are current approaches to the management of these infections.

MeSH terms

  • Actinomycosis* / diagnosis
  • Actinomycosis* / therapy
  • Aspergillosis / diagnosis
  • Aspergillosis / therapy
  • Blastomycosis / diagnosis
  • Blastomycosis / therapy
  • Coccidioidomycosis / diagnosis
  • Coccidioidomycosis / therapy
  • Cryptococcosis / diagnosis
  • Cryptococcosis / therapy
  • Histoplasmosis / diagnosis
  • Histoplasmosis / therapy
  • Humans
  • Mycobacterium Infections* / diagnosis
  • Mycobacterium Infections* / therapy
  • Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous / diagnosis
  • Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous / therapy
  • Mycoses* / diagnosis
  • Mycoses* / therapy
  • Nocardia Infections* / diagnosis
  • Nocardia Infections* / therapy
  • Pleural Diseases* / diagnosis
  • Pleural Diseases* / therapy
  • Pleural Effusion / diagnosis
  • Pleural Effusion / therapy
  • Tuberculosis, Pleural / diagnosis
  • Tuberculosis, Pleural / therapy