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. 1986 Feb;11(1):10-4.
doi: 10.1016/0266-7681(86)90003-3.

Blood Flow of Peripheral Nerve Effects of Dissection, Stretching and Compression

Blood Flow of Peripheral Nerve Effects of Dissection, Stretching and Compression

K Ogata et al. J Hand Surg Br. .

Abstract

Blood flow rate of the peripheral nerve was measured using the hydrogen washout technique and the effects of dissection, stretching and compression were studied on blood flow of the rabbit sciatic nerve. Regional surgical dissections revealed that a proximal portion of the sciatic nerve receives its blood supply from gluteal vessels whereas a distal portion receives from popliteal vessels. Blood flow direction in the proximal half of the sciatic nerve in the thigh was found to be distal whereas in the distal half to be proximal. The longitudinal pathway appeared to be capable of compensating for local diminution of blood flow. The average stretching of more than 15.7% caused complete arrest of blood flow in the stretched nerve. The average stretching force at this point was 74 grams. Complete standstill of intraneural circulation was observed under compression of 50 to 70 mm Hg, or 60 to 80% of mean arterial pressure. These values of critical stretching and compression on the intraneural blood flow corresponds well with those previously reported by Lundborg, 1973; Rydevik, 1981).

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