Treatment of tetanus neonatorum with muscle relaxants and intermittent positive-pressure ventilation

Br Med J. 1974 Feb 9;1(5901):223-6. doi: 10.1136/bmj.1.5901.223.

Abstract

Intermittent positive-pressure ventilation and muscle relaxants were first used in Cape Town in 1958 in an attempt to reduce the mortality from tetanus neonatorum, which was then over 90%. Problems of effective ventilation, of tracheostomy, and of infection in the neonate were gradually overcome so that between 1967 and 1972 the mortality in 186 cases was 21%. In a consecutive series of 97 cases the mortality was 10%.

MeSH terms

  • Airway Obstruction
  • Carbon Dioxide / analysis
  • Diazepam / therapeutic use
  • Humans
  • Humidity
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infant, Newborn, Diseases / therapy*
  • Methods
  • Neuromuscular Nondepolarizing Agents / therapeutic use*
  • Oxygen / analysis
  • Paraldehyde / therapeutic use
  • Parenteral Nutrition
  • Partial Pressure
  • Positive-Pressure Respiration*
  • Saliva
  • Temperature
  • Tetanus / therapy*
  • Tetanus Antitoxin / therapeutic use
  • Tracheotomy
  • Tubocurarine / therapeutic use
  • Weaning
  • gamma-Globulins / therapeutic use

Substances

  • Neuromuscular Nondepolarizing Agents
  • Tetanus Antitoxin
  • gamma-Globulins
  • Carbon Dioxide
  • Diazepam
  • Paraldehyde
  • Oxygen
  • Tubocurarine