Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 20 (4), 283-91

Sterilization in Bangladesh: Mortality, Morbidity, and Risk Factors

Sterilization in Bangladesh: Mortality, Morbidity, and Risk Factors

M J Rosenberg et al. Int J Gynaecol Obstet.

Abstract

Although surgical sterilization in Bangladesh is common and has been designated as the primary means of helping the country slow its population growth, no reliable information exists regarding the procedure's safety. To define the types and rates of medical complications associated with sterilization, we followed 5042 women and 264 men undergoing sterilization. The problems that increased most markedly after the procedure compared with before included painful urination, shaking chills, fever for at least 2 days, and frequent urination. Most of the postoperative problems could be predicted by the presence of the same problem before the operation. Factor analysis of complaints in those persons who did not have a specific preoperative complaint showed that complaints clustered into three groups: urinary tract symptoms (urinary urgency and frequency), skin problems (bleeding from the incision, sore with pus, and stitches or skin breaking open), and general complaints (weakness and dizziness). The patient's sex, the sponsor and patient load of the sterilization center, and the dose of sedatives administered to women were significantly associated with specific postoperative complaints. Five women died during the study, resulting in a death-to-case rate of 9.9/10,000 procedures tubectomies; four deaths were due to respiratory arrest caused by oversedation.

PIP: Data were collected from February-June 1980 on 5042 women and 264 men undergoing surgical sterilization in Bangladesh to define the types and rates of medical complications associated with sterilization. The major findings of this study are that: 1) one of every 1000 women undergoing sterilization in Bangladesh dies as a result of the procedure; 2) overuse of systemic sedatives is common and was the principle contributor to 5 deaths that occurred; and 3) chief health complaints are urinary tract symptoms, skin problems, and systemic complaints. The death-to-case rate of 9.9/10,000 procedures in this study is similar to the 10.0 deaths/10,000 cases estimated on the basis of a 1979 follow-up study in an Indian female sterilization camp. The presence of a complaint before the operation was generally a good predictor of postoperative complaints. Centers performing fewer than 200 procedures were associated with more complaints.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Publication types

Substances

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback