A prospective controlled study of the effect on blood pressure of contraceptive preparations containing different types and dosages of progestogen

Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1984 Dec;91(12):1254-60. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.1984.tb04747.x.

Abstract

A prospective controlled study investigated the effects of oral contraceptives on blood pressure in 485 women who were between 17 and 46 years of age and had blood pressures of less than 140/90 mmHg at entry. The women were divided into seven groups depending on the chosen method of contraception: intrauterine device or barrier method (control group): ethinyl oestradiol 30 micrograms plus levonorgestrel 150 micrograms (Microgynon-30 or Ovranette); norethisterone 350 micrograms (Micronor); norgestrel 75 micrograms (Neogest); norethisterone oenanthate 200 mg intramuscularly every 2 months for the first 6 months, then every 3 months thereafter; ethinyl oestradiol 30 micrograms plus ethynodiol diacetate 2 mg (Conova-30); and ethynodiol diacetate 500 micrograms (Femulen). Blood pressures were measured every 3 months by the family planning clinic nurse under standardized conditions using an Elag-Köln automatic sphygmomanometer. After one year, blood pressure had risen significantly (P less than 0.05) in the 137 women taking ethinyl oestradiol plus levonorgestrel (mean systolic and diastolic rises 6.4 and 2.7 mmHg respectively) and in the 91 women taking ethinyl oestradiol plus ethynodiol diacetate (mean systolic and diastolic rises 6.2 and 3.0 mmHg respectively). The 94 women taking the progestogen-only preparations and the 143 women in the control group showed no increases in blood pressure. These data were confirmed after 2 years of follow-up.

PIP: A prospective, controlled study investigated the effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) on blood pressure in 485 women who were between 17-46 years old and had blood pressures of 140/90 mmHg at entry. The women were divided into 7 groups depending on the chosen method of contraception: 1) IUD or barrier method (controls); 2) ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg plus levonorgestrel 150 mcg (Microgynon 30 or Ovranette); 3) norethisterone 350 mcg (Micronor); 4) norgestrel 75 mcg (Neogest); 5) norethisterone enanthate 200 mcg intramuscularly every 2 months for the 1st 6 months, then every 3 months thereafter; 6) ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg plus ethynodiol diacetate 2 mg (Conova 30); 7) and ethynodiol diacetate 500 mcg (Femulen). Blood pressures were measured every 3 months by the family planning clinic nurse under standardized conditions using an Elag-Koln automatic sphygmomanometer. After 1 year, blood pressure had risen significantly (P0.05) in the 137 women taking ethinyl estradiol plus levonorgestrel (mean systolic and diastolic rises 6.4 and 2.7 mmHg respectively) and in the 91 women taking ethinyl estradiol plus ethynodiol diacetate (mean systolic and diastolic rises 6.2 and 3.0 mmHg respectively). The 94 women taking the progestogen-only preparations and the 143 women in the control group showed no increases in blood pressure. These data were confirmed after 2 years of follow-up.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Blood Pressure / drug effects*
  • Clinical Trials as Topic
  • Contraceptives, Oral / administration & dosage
  • Contraceptives, Oral / pharmacology*
  • Contraceptives, Oral, Combined / administration & dosage
  • Contraceptives, Oral, Combined / pharmacology
  • Ethinyl Estradiol / administration & dosage
  • Ethynodiol Diacetate / administration & dosage
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Levonorgestrel
  • Middle Aged
  • Norethindrone / administration & dosage
  • Norethindrone / analogs & derivatives*
  • Norethindrone Acetate
  • Norgestrel / administration & dosage
  • Prospective Studies
  • Stereoisomerism

Substances

  • Contraceptives, Oral
  • Contraceptives, Oral, Combined
  • Norgestrel
  • Ethinyl Estradiol
  • Levonorgestrel
  • Ethynodiol Diacetate
  • Norethindrone Acetate
  • norethindrone enanthate
  • Norethindrone