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, 5 (4), 361-71

Hunger and Palatability: Tracking Ratings of Subjective Experience Before, During and After the Consumption of Preferred and Less Preferred Food

Hunger and Palatability: Tracking Ratings of Subjective Experience Before, During and After the Consumption of Preferred and Less Preferred Food

A J Hill et al. Appetite.

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of palatability on ratings of hunger and other states, food preferences, bodily sensations, feelings and moods. Assessments of these were made before, during and after 12 healthy female subjects ate small equicaloric meals of either highly preferred of less preferred food. The sight of highly preferred food markedly increased subjects' rated desire to eat and this elevation was maintained during consumption. Hunger ratings were also elevated but only during consumption of the highly preferred food and to a smaller extent. There was no effect of the palatability of the food on rated feelings of fullness. Two hours after the meal, ratings of desire to eat and hunger were significantly higher after consumption of highly preferred food. This effect did not occur after eating less preferred food. Feelings of general positive affect, which followed the highly preferred meal, did not occur with the less preferred food. These findings throw light on the nature of the rated expression of hunger and on other terms used in describing dispositions to eat.

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