Diagnosis and treatment of salpingitis

J Reprod Med. 1983 Oct;28(10 Suppl):709-11.

Abstract

The diagnosis of acute salpingitis no longer requires the patient to have fever, bilateral adnexal tenderness and/or swelling, leukocytosis and an elevated sedimentation rate. New criteria have been formulated. There is increasing awareness of the potential role of Chlamydia and increasing use of antibiotics effective against that organism.

PIP: It has been estimated that 1 million US women are treated annually for salpingitis. Diagnosis of salpingitis no longer requires the patient to have fever, bilateral adnexal tenderness and/or swelling, leukocytosis, and an elevated sedimentation rate. It has been demonstrated that, in contrast to traditional teachings, the recovery of all organisms. aerobes and anaerobes occurs most frequently in the early phases of the disease and the vast majority of women have mixed bacterial infections at the onset of their symptoms. The longer the duration of symptoms, the fewer organisms recovered. In recent years there has been an increasing awareness that chlamydia is important in infections of the female pelvis and chlamydia does not seem to cause the systemic symptoms usually associated with acute pelvic infection. Treatment for acute pelvic inflammatory disease can include cefoxitin, ampicillin, tetracycline, doxycycline, clindamycin, or metronidazole. Further research should study whether those women should be treated as outpatients or inpatients, and the health of the pelvis after treatment.

MeSH terms

  • Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use
  • Bacterial Infections / diagnosis
  • Chlamydia Infections / diagnosis
  • Doxycycline / therapeutic use
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Salpingitis / diagnosis*
  • Salpingitis / drug therapy
  • Salpingitis / etiology

Substances

  • Anti-Bacterial Agents
  • Doxycycline