Racial inequalities in housing: an examination of recent trends

Demography. 1982 Feb;19(1):37-51.

Abstract

Changes in racial differences in homeownership and objective indicators of housing quality are examined using 1960 Census data and 1977 Annual Housing Survey data. Blacks, net of differences in socioeconomic status, family composition, and regional-metropolitan location, remained less likely than whites to own homes and somewhat more likely to live in older, crowded and structurally inadequate units in 1977. In general, however, net effects for race were much smaller in 1977 than in 1960. Racial differences in homeownership and crowding were smaller among recent movers than among the total sample in 1977, suggesting continued but gradual improvement in housing conditions for blacks in the latter 1970s.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • African Americans*
  • Crowding
  • Family Characteristics
  • Female
  • Housing / trends*
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • United States
  • Whites