A case-control study of cancer of the endometrium

Am J Epidemiol. 1982 Aug;116(2):333-42. doi: 10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a113417.

Abstract

A hospital-based case-control study of the epidemiology of endometrial cancer in women aged 45-74 years was carried out in Connecticut from 1977 to 1979. In total, 167 cases and 903 controls were included. Elevated risks were associated with the following factors: overweight, nulliparity, few pregnancies, use of estrogen replacement therapy, older age at menopause, and a history of ovarian or endometrial cancer in mother or a sister. Whites were more frequently affected than blacks, and better-educated women more often than less-educated women. Use of oral contraceptives was associated with a decreased risk, although the decrease did not reach statistical significance.

PIP: A case-control study of the epidemiology of endometrial cancer in women aged 45-74 years was carried out in 7 hospitals in Connecticut from 1977-79. 167 cases of adenocarcinoma, adenocanthoma, and adenosquamous neoplasms of the endometrium were included. 903 women of the same age admitted to surgical services except gynecology served as controls. Response rates were 67% for cases and 72% for controls. Odds ratios for the association between selected variables and endometrial cancer, adjusted by linear logistic regression for the effect of all other variables in the table, indicated that elevated risks were associated with being white and being well-educated, among demographic variables, and with nulliparity, fewer pregnancies, later age at menopause, use of estrogen replacement therapy, and a history of ovarian or endometrial cancer in mother or a sister, among reproductive variables. The longer estrogen replacement therapy was used, the higher the risk, up to 10 years of use. Heavier women were found to be at higher risk, although the risk for women of medium weight was only slightly increased. Women who reported a history of diabetes had a somewhat increased risk, while a history of ever having blood clots in the veins or of having had tubes tied was associated with reduced risk. Use of oral contraceptives was associated with a decreased risk, although the decrease did not reach statistical significance.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Age Factors
  • Aged
  • Analysis of Variance
  • Body Weight
  • Connecticut
  • Contraceptives, Oral / adverse effects*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Menopause
  • Middle Aged
  • Parity
  • Risk
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Time Factors
  • Uterine Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • Uterine Neoplasms / etiology*

Substances

  • Contraceptives, Oral