Peripheral Blood Flow in the Neonate; 1. Changes in Total, Skin, and Muscle Blood Flow With Gestational and Postnatal Age

Pediatr Res. 1980 Dec;14(12):1374-8. doi: 10.1203/00006450-198012000-00023.

Abstract

Total peripheral blood flow and blood flow through the skin and muscle were measured in the calf with an electrocapacitance plethysmograph with counter pressure in a group of 62 "well" newborn infants (birth weight, less than 3500 g). Blood pressure in the contralateral leg was measured with an Arteriosonde 1010, and peripheral vascular resistance was calculated as mean blood pressure (mm Hg) divided by blood flow (ml per 100 ml tissue per min). The results show that total peripheral blood flow and blood flow through he skin and muscle correlated inversely with increasing birth weight and gestational age. Postnatally, total blood flow and blood flow through the skin and muscle decreased gradually during the first 7 days of life and in the rest of the neonatal period. Peripheral vascular resistance and resistance in the skin and muscle correlated directly with increasing birth weight and gestational age. Postnatally, peripheral vascular resistance and resistance in the skin and muscle increased during the first 7 days of life and the neonatal period.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study

MeSH terms

  • Aging*
  • Birth Weight
  • Blood Circulation*
  • Gestational Age
  • Humans
  • Infant, Newborn*
  • Leg / blood supply
  • Muscles / blood supply
  • Regional Blood Flow
  • Skin / blood supply
  • Vascular Resistance