Socioeconomic differences in sexually transmitted disease rates among black and white adolescents, San Francisco, 1990 to 1992

Am J Public Health. 1995 Nov;85(11):1546-8. doi: 10.2105/ajph.85.11.1546.

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of socioeconomic position on the differences in the 3-year rates (1990 to 1992) of reported cases of gonorrhea and chlamydia between Black and White adolescents, aged 12 to 20 years, residing in San Francisco. The crude relative risks for Blacks were 23.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 20.4, 27.8) for gonorrhea and 9.3 (95% CI = 8.3, 10.3) for chlamydia. Adjusting for poverty and occupational status, the relative risks were 28.7 (95% CI = 22.5, 36.1) for gonorrhea and 8.9 (95% CI = 7.4, 10.6) for chlamydia. This study demonstrates that factors other than poverty and occupational status account for the racial/ethnic differences in the rates of gonorrhea and chlamydia among adolescents in San Francisco.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • African Americans*
  • Child
  • Chlamydia Infections / ethnology*
  • Employment
  • European Continental Ancestry Group*
  • Female
  • Gonorrhea / ethnology*
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Poisson Distribution
  • Poverty
  • Risk
  • San Francisco / epidemiology
  • Social Class*