The Role of IL-12 in the Induction of Organ-Specific Autoimmune Diseases

Immunol Today. 1995 Aug;16(8):383-6. doi: 10.1016/0167-5699(95)80006-9.

Abstract

The concept that T cells are subdivided into T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 subsets was recently extended to suggest that Th1 cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several organ-specific autoimmune diseases, whereas Th2 cells inhibit disease development. Here, Sylvie Trembleau and colleagues examine the role of interleukin 12 (IL-12), a key cytokine guiding the development of Th1 cells, in the induction of autoimmune diseases, and discuss potential immunointervention strategies based on administration of IL-12 antagonists.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Antibodies, Monoclonal / immunology
  • Antibodies, Monoclonal / pharmacology
  • Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use
  • Arthritis / chemically induced
  • Arthritis / immunology
  • Autoimmune Diseases / chemically induced
  • Autoimmune Diseases / drug therapy
  • Autoimmune Diseases / immunology*
  • Collagen / toxicity
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / chemically induced
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / immunology
  • Drug Design
  • Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental / immunology
  • Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental / therapy
  • Female
  • Immunosuppressive Agents / pharmacology
  • Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use
  • Immunotherapy, Adoptive
  • Interleukin-12 / antagonists & inhibitors
  • Interleukin-12 / physiology*
  • Interleukin-12 / toxicity
  • Mice
  • Mice, Inbred BALB C
  • Mice, Inbred NOD
  • Models, Immunological
  • Organ Specificity / immunology*
  • Th1 Cells / immunology*

Substances

  • Antibodies, Monoclonal
  • Immunosuppressive Agents
  • Interleukin-12
  • Collagen