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. Jul-Aug 1995;6(4):273-7.
doi: 10.1177/095646249500600410.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Among Women With Genital Infections in Burkina Faso

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Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Among Women With Genital Infections in Burkina Faso

N Meda et al. Int J STD AIDS. .

Abstract

This study reports the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among gynaecological outpatients presenting at the Bobo-Dioulasso Hospital (Burkina Faso) with genital infections and examines the factors associated with HIV infection in this population. Of 245 eligible non-pregnant women, 220 consented to participate in the study. Seventy-seven per cent had sexually transmitted infections. The most common were: Trichomonas vaginalis (28%), Chlamydia trachomatis (27%), bacterial vaginosis (20%), Candida albicans (17%), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (11%). The prevalence of HIV infection was 42% (95% c.i. 35.3, 48.3). Logistic regression analyses revealed Neisseria gonorrhoeae to be the only STD significantly associated with infection with HIV (P = 0.04). A sedimentation rate greater than or equal to 100 mm in the first hour was also associated with HIV infection (P < 0.001). Women consulting for genital infections constitute a high risk group for HIV infection and other STDs. Management of these women should focus on the early diagnosis and treatment of STDs.

PIP: During May-October 1992 in the gynecology and obstetrics department at the National Central Hospital Souro Sanou in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso, physicians conducted a physical examination of and took vaginal smears from 220 nonpregnant women of reproductive age who consented to take part in this study and who had clinical signs of a genital infection. The researchers wanted to determine the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and the factors associated with HIV infection. 77% had an STD. The most common STDs were Trichomonas vaginalis (28%) and Chlamydia trachomatis (27%). 42% were HIV positive. HIV-positive women were significantly more likely than HIV-negative women to be infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (30.4% vs. 24.2%; p = 0.03). Risk factors associated with HIV infection among women presenting with genital infections included young age (25.5 vs. 27.5 years; p = 0.03), low gravidity (2 vs. 2.7; p = 0.04), a higher sedimentation rate in the first hour (75.3 vs. 54; p 0.001), and a low hemoglobin level (11.7 vs. 12.2 g/dl; p = 0.01). These findings indicate that women with genital infections are a group at high risk of HIV and other STDs and a target population for preventive interventions. Physicians should focus on detection and treatment of STDs when they manage cases with genital infections, and they should give appropriate advice on the prevention of HIV to all women presenting with genital infections.

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