Long-term costs for foot ulcers in diabetic patients in a multidisciplinary setting

Foot Ankle Int. 1995 Jul;16(7):388-94. doi: 10.1177/107110079501600702.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to analyze long-term costs for foot ulcers in diabetic patients. Patients were treated and followed prospectively by a foot care team. A retrospective economic analysis was performed of costs for 274 patients during 3 years from healing of an initial foot ulcer, with or without amputation. Costs were estimated for inpatient care, outpatient care, home care, and social service. The cost calculations include costs due to complications and disability related to the initial ulcer, costs related to recurrence of ulcer, and costs for prevention of new ulcers. Expected total present value cost per patient during 3 years of observation was $26,700 (U.S. dollars) for primary healed patients with critical ischemia and $16,100 for primary healed patients without critical ischemia. For patients who healed with an amputation, the corresponding costs were $43,100 after a minor amputation and $63,100 after a major amputation. When estimating the costs for diabetic foot ulcers, it is not sufficient to calculate short-term costs. Long-term costs are high, mainly due to the need for increased home care and social service, but also due to costs for recurrent ulcers and new amputations.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Activities of Daily Living
  • Ambulatory Care / economics
  • Amputation / economics
  • Anti-Bacterial Agents / economics
  • Combined Modality Therapy
  • Costs and Cost Analysis
  • Diabetic Foot / complications
  • Diabetic Foot / economics*
  • Diabetic Foot / prevention & control
  • Diabetic Foot / therapy
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Foot / blood supply
  • Home Care Services, Hospital-Based / economics
  • Hospitalization / economics
  • Humans
  • Ischemia / economics
  • Life Style
  • Long-Term Care / economics*
  • Patient Care Team / economics*
  • Prospective Studies
  • Recurrence
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Social Work / economics
  • Sweden
  • Weight-Bearing
  • Wound Healing

Substances

  • Anti-Bacterial Agents